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Day #1 at AES

December 6, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments

I think this is –yikes — the 17th Annual American Epilepsy Society meeting in a row I have attended!  The folks that were young investigators when I started, are now the esteemed, established investigators. There’s a new crop of young investigators who fill us all with hope.  Some are our new grantees, and I’m looking forward to meeting them personally to congratulate and encourage them to continue to make epilepsy their career path. It’s fun to look around and wonder which of them will be the leaders in their time, and the ones to make meaningful breakthroughs.

The halls and sessions are filled with so many great individuals—many I’m honored to call friends–who have assisted CURE in so many ways over these years.  Serving on our Scientific Advisory Boards, reviewing grants, helping spread the word to researchers and patients. It is a great community.

Over the next few days, I’ll share pictures with you from just a few of the sessions and meetings going on here in Washington DC–sometimes the greatest challenge is selecting which to attend. But, as always, some of the greatest conversations and networking opportunities happen in the corridors and on coffee breaks!

Had a great 5-hour meeting yesterday of our infantile spasms (IS) team. Researchers shared with each other their first year's work. Here's Dr. Doug Nordli of Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.

Had a great 5-hour meeting yesterday of our infantile spasms (IS) team. Researchers shared with each other their first year’s work. Here’s Dr. Doug Nordli of Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

We gave everybody - our researchers, advisors and CURE staff and Board - a quick break to pose for this picture. What amazing brain power is going into finding a cure for IS.

We gave everybody – our researchers, advisors and CURE staff and Board – a quick break to pose for this picture. What amazing brain power is going into finding a cure for IS.

Dr. Galanapoulou of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine presents her first-year findings.

Dr. Galanapoulou of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine presents her first-year findings.

Chris Dulla, PhD demonstrates some of his progress as our Tracy Dixon-Salazar, PhD and Dan Lowenstein, MD look on.

Chris Dulla, PhD demonstrates some of his progress as our Tracy Dixon-Salazar, PhD and Dan Lowenstein, MD look on.

Late last night Tracy, Steve White, PhD and I met with epilepsy program directors from NINDS and top geneticists in the field to explore opportunities to work together.

Late last night Tracy, Steve White, PhD and I met with epilepsy program directors from NINDS and top geneticists in the field to explore opportunities to work together.

It’s so rewarding to see CURE-funded research so prevalent at this meeting in talks, special interest groups, poster sessions and beyond. We have planted so many seeds that have really taken off over these years. Many of you have enabled us to do this with your support. Please remember—and help us spread the word—-that we have an amazing matching grant that will double all donations received between now and December 31st up to $250,000 !  Now’s a critical time to give, and your support will continue to enable us to fund much more of the innovative research CURE is known for in 2014 and beyond!

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